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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

5 edition of The standardisation of African languages found in the catalog.

The standardisation of African languages

The standardisation of African languages

language political realities : CentRePol and IFAS proceedings of a CentRePol workshop held at the University of Pretoria on March 29, 2007, supported by the French Institute of Southern Africa

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Published by IFAS in Johannesburg .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

StatementMichel Lafon & Vic Webb, compilers/editors.
SeriesIFAS working paper series = -- Les nouveaux cahiers de l"IFAS -- no. 11
ContributionsLafon, Michel., Webb, Victor N., IFAS (Institute : South Africa), CentRePol.
The Physical Object
Pagination140 p. :
Number of Pages140
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23025400M
LC Control Number2009349073

Browse the list of issues and latest articles from Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies. Abstract. In this chapter, I assume a visionary role, and invite the reader to join me in an imaginary journey from the status quo of American educational policy to a possible future in which African American language is seen by the average person as it is presently seen by linguists: as an instance of normal language.

== On J , linguists and others from Africa and Europe met in London and launched the International Institute of African Languages and Cultures (Oraka p. 32). == IIALC published a pamphlet, Practical Orthography of African Languages. 8 vowels and 28 consonants, with "gw," "kw," and "nw" added for Igbo sounds. Chapter 1: What is language? 1 Chapter 1 What is language? This book is an introduction to the study of human language across the planet. It is concerned with the immense variety among the languages of the world, as well as the common traits that cut across the differences. The book presents a .

  Nwando Achebe’s new book is a fascinating look at Africa’s queens, past and present From spiritual leaders to parliamentarians and presidents, women are reclaiming leadership roles. By. African languages have only two level tones, high and low. 3 Tonal representations such as the above were shown to run into a number of problems. In many African languages, a falling tone such as in (1b) shows “edge effects”: It appears to be a H.


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The standardisation of African languages Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Standardisation of African Languages Language political realities CentRePoL and IFAS Proceedings of a CentRePoL workshop held at University of Pretoria on Ma book on the education system under transformation inand a recent one on inequalities2.

The Standardisation of African Languages. Lafon (), at a workshop on the standardization of African languages, argued that the linguistic context of Gauteng, for example, which is multilingual, cannot be directly codified, as. This book is the first general introduction to African languages and linguistics to be published in English.

It covers The standardisation of African languages book four major language groupings (Niger-Congo, Nilo-Saharan, Afroasiatic and Khoisan), the core areas of modern theoretical linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax), typology, sociolinguistics, comparative linguistics, and language, history and by:   Eme and Mbagwu ( ) observe government policies that could encourage the use of African languages in African literature are absent.

For instance, no African language. The intended audience of this book Anyone producing a book about this mass of languages has inevit-ably to make certain choices. There are older introductions to African languages in English (Berry and GreenbergWelmersGregersen ), there are volumes that deal with some but not all African languages (BenderBendor.

The book is organized by linguistic domain or sub-field within linguistics, and each of the chapters can be read independently. Readers can thus read selectively or read the book sequentially from cover-to-cover.

Instructors can use the book as a text for a course in African languages or even language. 1 day ago  This edited book examines the crucial role still played by African languages in pedagogy and literatures in the 21 st century, generating insights into how they effectively serve cultural needs across the African continent and beyond.

Boldly positioning African languages as key resources in the 21 st century, chapters focus on themes such as language revolt by marginalized groups at.

Jennifer Bloomquist, editor Jennifer Bloomquist is Associate Professor of Linguistics and the coordinator of the Africana Studies Program at Gettysburg College.

Her work has been published in First Language, Journal of Pragmatics, Multilingua, and American most recent article, “The Dirty Third: Contributions of Southern Hip Hop to the Study of African American English” (with.

The language was later on finally registered as "Xitsonga" within the Constitution of South Africa (Act of ) and it was declared an official language. The standardization of the Xitsonga language as a result made it possible for the Tsonga people to develop a common way of speaking and writing.

Language Endangerment in Africa: /ch The aim of this chapter is to lay a foundation so as to consider the issue of language endangerment in. and standardisation of languages and orthographies slow or non-existent; and the level of literacy is generally very low in the official metropolitan languages.

This has led to a situation of "linguistic imperialism" and continued dependence on colonial languages. The use of books written in the European metro-languages.

The most spoken African languages by number of native speakers. Because many Africans are at least bilingual, there are two possible ways to determine the most spoken African languages: by the number of native speakers or by overall numbers, including L2 speakers.

Ebonics, also called African American Vernacular English (AAVE), formerly Black English Vernacular (BEV), dialect of American English spoken by a large proportion of African Americans.

Many scholars hold that Ebonics, like several English creoles, developed from contacts between nonstandard varieties of colonial English and African languages. Its exact origins continue to be debated, however.

--Language policy and initial steps towards language standardization in "Luzophone" African countries / Eugeniusz Rzewuski (6 p.).

--Langues Zairoises et standardisation: / Lungenyi L Maalu-Bungi (6 p.). --Standardization of the orthography of Kenyan languages. In an English-speaking country, Standard English (SE) is the variety of English that has undergone substantial regularization and is associated with formal schooling, language assessment, and official print publications, such as public service announcements and newspapers of record, etc.

"Standard" should be understood to refer to this process of regularization and not to minimal desirability. The site includes an extensive listing of print publications [for sale in South Africa] and research program news.

"The major area of current involvement of CASAS is the classification of African Languages on the basis of mutual intelligibility. This work is part of the CASAS Harmonization and Standardization of African Languages Project.".

THE MARGINALISATION OF INDIGENOUS AFRICAN LANGUAGES ON THE EDUCATION SYSTEM: A CRITICAL REFLECTION ON HOW AFRICAN LEARNERS ARE DENIED OPPORTUNITIES TO SUCCEED IN LIFE Introduction At the beginning of each year, the South African public is confronted with the disappointing Grade 12 results of pupils who use African languages at home.

A goal of this book is to stimulate interest in African languages and address the question: What makes African languages so fascinating. The orientation adopted throughout the book is a descriptive one, which seeks to characterize African languages in a relatively succinct and neutral manner, and to make the facts accessible to a wide.

The Niger–Congo languages constitute the largest language family spoken in West Africa and perhaps the world in terms of the number of languages. One of its salient features is an elaborate noun class system with grammatical concord.A large majority of languages of this family are tonal such as Yoruba and Igbo, Ashanti and Ewe language.A major branch of Niger–Congo languages is the Bantu.

African languages is as much a cultural issue as it is a political problem. Ngugi wa Thiongo in Kenya is one of the few writers who has been trying to break out of this vicious imperialist circle. The importance of this writer in present African.

This book is the first general introduction to African languages and linguistics to be published in English. It covers the four major language groupings (Niger-Congo, Nilo-Saharan, Afroasiatic and Khoisan), the core areas of modern theoretical linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax), typology, sociolinguistics, comparative linguistics, and language, history and society.4/5(1).Most linguists, myself included, think of black English, or African American Vernacular English (AAVE) as a dialect of English.

It may exhibit some features derived from African languages, but it.